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Kota :

Kota was established as an Independently Ruled State in 1624, by permission of Emperor Jahangir, and later Emperor Shahjahan formalized the State of Kota in 1631 AD.

First Ruler of Kota was Rao Madho Singh. He was the second son of Rao Ratan Singh of Bundi. Rao Madho Singh came to Kota with his five sons. He encouraged his younger four son’s to capture their own territories and establish their own independent Jagirs (land grants) under the State of Kota. Early in 19 C. Zalim Singh Jhala became The Regent when the Ruler of Kota died leaving a minor successor to the throne.

The British were very close to Zalim Singh Jhala, and referred to him as “ Talleyrand of North India,” because under Zalim Singh Kota was the first State in Rajasthan to sign a treaty with the British in 1817 !

When the ruler of Kota came of age, he wanted Zalim Singh Jhala to leave Kota. The British had assured Zalim Singh Jhala a hereditary Prime Ministership of the Kota State in return for signing of the Treaty with the British. In order to satisfy Zalim Singh Jhala, the British decided to create the State of Jhalawar in 1838, from half the area of Kota State.

The City Palace (Rao Madho Singh Museum ): Mural Paintings in City Palace cover large area’s of the walls. More than 300 original Miniature Paintings of Kota School of Art (17th to 19th AD) can also be seen at this Palace Museum .

City Walls of Kota : The original inner City Wall was completed in 1700. The outer wall, which is much larger & stronger, was completed in 1800. Two elephants could pull the large guns on top of this wall.

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Brijraj Bhawan Palace was the former British Residency, built around in 1840. Present Maharao Briraj Singhji and family are residing here.

Brijraj Bhawan Palace   Brijraj Bhawan Palace   Brijraj Bhawan Palace
         
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Umed Bhawan Palace was built in 1905 by Maharao Umed Singh II of Kota ( 1889 – 1940 ), out side the Walled City of Kota. Umed Bhawan Palace was designed by Sir Swinton Jacob.

Maharao Umed Singh II also had built :
1.         The State Guest House in 1900
2.         The Kota Railway Station in 1906
3.         Herbart College in 1910

Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace
         
Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace
         
Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace
         
Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace
         
Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace
         
Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace   Umaid Bhawan Palace
         

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Govt. Museum Kota :

Housed in the Brijvilas Palace near the Kishore Sagar.The meuseum displays a rich collection of rare coins, manuscripts and a representative selection of Hadoti sculpture. Specially noteworthy is an exquisitely sculptured statue of reclining Vishnu brought here from Badoli.
         
Govt Museum Kota   Govt Museum Kota   Govt Museum Kota

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Garh Palace Kota        
City Palace Kota   City Palace Kota   City Palace Kota
         
Rao Madho Singh Museum   Rao Madho Singh Museum   Rao Madho Singh Museum
         
Rao Madho Singh Museum   Rao Madho Singh Museum   Rao Madho Singh Museum
         
City Palace Kota   City Palace Kota    
         
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Jagmandir Kishore Sagar Kota
Jagmandir Kishore Sagar Kota
 

Kishore Sagar - Built by a Bundi Prince in 1346, and the Temple Island Jagmandir was Built later in 1740 AD by a Udaipur Princess who married a Kota Prince.

Chambal Gardens and the Irrigation Dam at Kota were completed in 1960 by the Government of India.

Chambal River is the largest of the five main River’s in “Hadoti”. For nearly 100 Km, from Gandhi Sagar to Kota the River Chambal mostly flows through a deep gorge with cliffs rising up to 350 ft. in height. All rivers in Hadoti are rain fed rivers flowing from south to north.

The Chambal supports a number of Power Projects generating electricity that is supplied to the State of Rajasthan.


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Lakkhi Burj
 
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Lakkhi Burj
 
 
City Palace Kota   City Palace Kota   City Palace Kota
 
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OTTAR'S ARE FROM CHAMBAL

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Boating in the Chambal River :

In this section of the River Chambal you can use the motor boats for visiting the wonderful deep gorges that to this day support virgin forests where tigers were found until the early 1950’s. Variety of birds are to be seen breeding here, along the rock cliffs and embankments of the Chambal River.

This area is one of the largest Vulture breeding areas to-day in India . During winter months the Marsh Crocodiles can be sighted here regularly, along with Blue Bulls, Chinkara’s and Jackals from the boats. If you are lucky Panthers and Bear can also be spotted occasionally.

 
Boating in the Chambal River
Boating in the Chambal River
Boating in the Chambal River   Boating in the Chambal River   Boating in the Chambal River
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The Royal Cenotaphs: Located below Kishore Sagar. They are beautifully carved. The stone carvings and elephants are very impressive.
Royal Cenotaphs Kota
The Royal Cenotaphs   
Royal Cenotaphs Kota
Royal Cenotaphs Kota Royal Cenotaphs Kota

The Royal Cenotaphs   

The Royal Cenotaphs   
The Royal Cenotaphs   
Royal Cenotaphs Kota Royal Cenotaphs Kota Royal Cenotaphs Kota

The Royal Cenotaphs   

The Royal Cenotaphs   
The Royal Cenotaphs   
Royal Cenotaphs Kota Royal Cenotaphs Kota Royal Cenotaphs Kota

The Royal Cenotaphs   

The Royal Cenotaphs   
The Royal Cenotaphs   
Royal Cenotaphs Kota Royal Cenotaphs Kota Royal Cenotaphs Kota

The Royal Cenotaphs   

The Royal Cenotaphs   
The Royal Cenotaphs   
     
Royal Cenotaphs Kota Royal Cenotaphs Kota Royal Cenotaphs Kota

The Royal Cenotaphs   

The Royal Cenotaphs   
The Royal Cenotaphs   

Chambal Irrigation & Agriculture :
Kota has always been considered the granary for Rajasthan. Today the Chambal Canal is Irrigating over 600,000 hectors of land in the states of Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh to produce over 600,000 tons of Agriculture produce. From Kota the right bank canal runs east for 364 Km through Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh to rejoin the River Chambal near Etawah in U.P.


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Dusky horned Owl
Long Billed Vulture Nesting
Long Billed Vulture Nesting

Dusky horned Owl

Long Billed Vulture Nesting
Long Billed Vulture Nesting
     
Purple Heron - Chambal Big Crocidle in Chambal Akelgarh Fort 10th NC
Purple Heron - Chambal Big Crocidle in Chambal Akelgarh Fort Tenth Century
     
White Necked Storks White Necked Stork Black Winged Kite Juvenile
White Necked Storks White Necked Stork Black Winged Kite Juvenile
     
common krestel Marsh Harrier White eyed Buzzard
Common krestel Marsh Harrier White Eyed Buzzard
     
White eyed Buzzard White Eyed Buzzard Juvenile bat
White Eyed Buzzard White Eyed Buzzard Juvenile White Eyed Buzzard Juvenile
     
bat bat bat
     
bat bat bat
Sloth Bear Sloth Bear Sloth Bear
bat bat Panther
Chambal Panther's Chambal Panther's Chambal Panther's
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Badoli Temples - 45 km southwest of Kota : - about an hours drive from Kota. The road to these beautiful ninth to twelfth century temples runs parallel to the river Chambal and enters the the Darah Wild Life Sanctuary through a lovely thickly wooded ghat (hill) section. Badoli Temples are in a grove and have some of the best temple architecture that can be seen in Rajasthan. Total of 73 Temples were said to have been built here between 9th and12th C. in Nagar Style by the Rulers of Bhensrodgadh. These temples resemble the Khajuraho and Nagda Temples. Originally there were 42 Shiva, 22 Vishnu and 9 Surya, with Ganesh & other temples here.

The main surviving temple here is the Ghateshwara Mahadeo temple. In front of it is the mandap (hall). The entire Ghateshwar Mahadeo temple is beautifuly adorned with amorous figures of apsaras (nymphs), and the deities Ganga and Yamuna carved with delicate grace. This 58 ft. high Ghateshwar Mahadev Temple is the best of the surviving temples. This Temple has a very nice ‘Kalash’ at the top and a finely carved flag bearer Carvings on all surviving temples are very beautiful.
Next to it on one side is the temple of Ganesh and on the other is that of Kali. There is also a Trimurti temple here. Unfortunately many of the figers were disfigured by Muslim armies in medieval times.

There is a smaller group of damaged temples set around a small rectangular pool. The famous statue of Shesh Shayyi Vishnua, the reclining Vishnu, now on view at the Government Museum, Kota, was originally from here. The courtyard is littered with beautiful carved stone pieces from the remains of the destroyed buildings here, including a torana (gate). Some of the good pieces lie in a store near these temples and can be viewed with permission of the Archaeological Survey of India.

Badoli Temple
Badoli Temple
Badoli Temple
Badoli Ghateshwar Mahadeo Flag
Bearer
Badoli Ghateshwar Mahadeo
Temple
Badoli Temple Pillar

Badoli Temple
Badoli Temple
Badoli Temple
Badoli Temples
Badoli Temple
Ghateshwar Mahadev Temple -
Badoli
     
Badoli Temple
Badoli Temple
Badoli Temple
Unique carved subjects on Badoli
Temple
Badoli Temple Pillars
Badoli Temple

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Gaipernath : On the road to Badoli 22 km) away is the lovely big chasm of Gaipar Nath with an old Shiva temple set in a deep gorge, with a spectacular vies of the rugged beauty of the forests and the cliffs of the Chambal valley.

Gaipernath
Gaipernath
Gaipernath
Gaipernath
Gaipernath
Gaipernath

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Darah
Wildlife Sanctuary : forest area ,56 km south of Kota, was once the hunting preserve of the Maharaos of Kota. It was a rich abode of flora and fauna, especially the tiger. It is called Darah for short the full name being Mukundarrah named after Rao Mukund Singh of Kota. Darrah in Persian means a pass and this strategic pass is the only place between the rivers Chambal and the River Kalisind where an army can pass through. Many battles were fought near here between the Kheenchi and the Hada Rajputs.

These vast jungles sheltered even wild Buffalo and Rhino in those days, as is evident from our old records and the Cave paintings. Beside the Mahals are the ruins of the ancient Bhim Chauri temples. The name is derived from its link with the legendary Bhimsen of Mahabharata fame as it is believed he got married here to a demon princess Hidimba. There is a stone inscription dating back to the fifth century A.D. which tells us that Dhruvaswamy, a general of the Imperial Guptas died here fighting against the hoons (Huns).
 
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Darah
 
Darah
 
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Dara Mahal
Bheem Chori Mandir
Abli Meeni ka Mahal
     
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Pre - Historic Rock-Painting :

Similar Pre - Hostric Rock Painting are to be seen at Garadda (Bundi) and Gandhi Sagar (Nr. Jhalawar).

Alniya-Rock-Painting
Alniya-Rock-Painting
Alniya-Rock-Painting
Rock-Painting
Rock-Painting
Rock-Painting

Alniya-Rock-Painting
Alniya-Rock-Painting
Alniya-Rock-Painting
Rock-Painting
Rock-Painting
Rock-Painting
     
Alniya-Rock-Painting
Alniya-Rock-Painting
Alniya-Rock-Painting
Rock-Painting
Rock-Painting
Rock-Painting

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Bijolia Temples : 80 km west of Kota on the highway- NH 27 to Chittorgarh are three interesting locations.

The first is Bijolian. A great cultural center of the Chauhan kings in the 10th century. It has yielded some key stone inscriptions mentioning the full genealogy of the great Chauhan kings and the first historical mention of Delhi dating back to 1170 A.D. Later Bijolia came under Mewar and was a stronghold of a Parmar feudatory. It has some very ancient and beautiful temples. The Shiva and Ganesh temples being of rare beauty. There used to be as many as a hundred temples around this place but now most are ruined.

Bijoliya
Bijoliya
Bijoliya
Bijolia -Temple
Bijolia-Surya Kund
Bijolia -Temple

Bijoliya
Bijoliya
Bijoliya
Bijolia -Temple
Bijolia -Temple
Bijolia -Temple

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Menal : From Bijolia the road goes past Menal, which has another beautiful group of 12th century temples and ruins. This place gets its name from Mahanal (the great gorge) was a habitation of considerable importance, as is evident from the ruins. It was retreat of the great Prithviraj II. The stones of the temples are extensively carved and decorated, showing Lord Shiva and his consort Parvati in different poses with beautiful frieze of animals, musicians and dancers. There is a breathtaking view of the gorge from the courtyard of the temple.

Opposite the temple complex, across the highway, is a small pretty lake shaded by trees at the edge of a forest.

Meenal
Meenal
Meenal
Menal
Shiva-Temple-Menal
Menal-Temple-Complex

Meenal
Meenal
Meenal
Menal-Water-fall
Menal
Menal-Shiva-Temple

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Jogania Mata Temple – About 10 km along the top of the escarpment, towards the east, the road leads to the ancient temple of Jogania Mata. Nearby are the old ruins of Bambaoda Fort. This is first place where the Hadas took shelter in the 12th century before founding of Bundi.

About 15 Km from Menal towards the south, the road branching west from the main highway to Udaipur takes one to the old Fort of Mandalgarh. It was one of the very first of the 35-odd forts built by that great king of Mewar Rana Kumbha. It commands a good view from the top of the escarpment.

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Gardia Mahadev : It is a picturesque picnic location on National Highway 27 above the river Chambal.

Apart from the Temple, the near by 250 ft high Chambal embankment is wonderful for photography, bird watching & picnics. Just 24 km from Kota, off the Udaipur High Way 27

Gardiya-Mahadev
Gardiya-Mahadev
Gardiya-Mahadev
Gardia Mahadev
Gardia Mahadev
Gardia Mahadev

Gardiya-Mahadev
Gardiya-Mahadev
Gardiya-Mahadev
Gardia Mahadev
Gardia Mahadev
Gardia Mahadev

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Kaithoon Village - Famous for Doria Saris :

Pure Kota Doria saris can be found only in Kota, but the people who originally weaved them were not from here. They were brought to Kota in 17th century by the Rao of Kota who was in Mysore with his army when he came across the weavers of the doria cloth. This cotton and silk fabric intricately woven with colourful floral motifs caught his fancy. He brought its makers to Kota. Interestingly doria weaving has now diedout in Mysore and is flourishing only in Kota. The finished fabric is also known as Kota Masuria (from the word Mysore) as a tribute to its original ancestry. Kota is also celebrated for its painted ceramics and black painted pottery, filigree work (thin strands of silver or gold wound around ornaments), calico (heavy cotton cloth) printing and lacer work on toys and inexpensive ornaments.

 
Famous for Doria Saris - Kaithoon Village
Kota Doria Sari   Kota Doria Sari   Kota Doria Sari

  Copyright 2010 Hadoti Tourism Development Society. All rights reserved.